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A video that observes Mosuo men and women building new houses by Lugu Lake in southwestern China’s Yunnan province. The voice comes from an interview the artist conducted with a young Mosuo girl who talks about the custom of the “walking marriage” (zou hun in Chinese). In a walking marriage, the ancestral line on the wife’s side of the family is most important and the couple’s children live and belong to the wife’s family household. Considering women are responsible for most domestic jobs, they also have a larger role in the walking marriage and are viewed with more respect and importance in this society. In Mosuo society, there are no fathers, only uncles, and all family members are descended from the same woman.

This work has been shown at
Any Day Now, Lentos Kunstmuseum, Linz, 2011
Red, Black, Silver, and White, Arndt Contemporary, Berlin, 2010
Unpossessing femininity: No more bad girls?
, Kunsthalle Exnergasse, Wien, 2010
Any Day Now, Kunsthalle Nürnberg, 2010
Mosuo Fireplace Goddess, Currents – Art & Music, Beijing, 2007